Pope: ‘God does not play dice with human life’

Moldova’s former president has accused his successor of undermining the country’s Catholic Church and urged him to “stop” trying to “destroy the church” by the end of his term.

Pontifical Council for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) Archbishop Konstantin Novikov made the comments as he attended a public prayer vigil for Moldova at the presidential palace in the capital, Bucharest.

He also called on the Romanian and Romanian-speaking populations in the Moldovan capital to continue to pray together.

“There is a need to maintain unity in the Church, the people and the country.

We are facing difficulties, but we need God to help us,” Novikova said, adding that “there is no need to destroy the church”.

“The Church has never been a threat to anyone.

We have no intention to destroy its unity.

It is our country.

God has never played dice with our humanity.

Novikovich also said he believed Moldova had the right to have a “political union” with the EU, saying that the EU had to be respected. “

I hope that by the time the next pope is elected, he will continue to work for the people, for the Church and for the country.”

Novikovich also said he believed Moldova had the right to have a “political union” with the EU, saying that the EU had to be respected.

“Moldova is an independent country.

But we need a European union, so we can have a real EU, a union of states,” he said.

He said Moldova could not have a foreign policy of its own, but instead should look to the EU as its “guardian”.

Moldova was granted independence in 1989 following the fall of communism and was formally recognized as a state in 2002.

Pope Francis visited Moldova in October 2018 to celebrate the centenary of Moldova becoming a member of the EU.